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Sunday, February 15, 2015


I wanted to give some of the links to research on other groups enslaved in America. I will be covering some of this information at the Author Appearance & Discussion at Medu Bookstore in Greenbriar Mall Feb. 17th, March 7th, 2015 & at Columbia, SC programs.


Purchase of Christian captives from the Barbary States in Algiers by Catholic monks 1661.
Barbary States were the countries that were
Berber or MoroccoAlgeriaTunisia, and Libya.

Slavery was not just West Africans.

In this post I will include some of the documents that show
other people were enslaved in America & worldwide. 

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I was taught that every country in the world has experienced the evils of slavery with the exception of Switzerland and Ethiopia has never been colonized but individuals were taken and enslaved.

Here is an escaped slave advertisement
"A Slave of the Indian Breed" 

Newspaper article reporting on a "captured ship 
from East Africa containing "slaves" in the 1880's.

In middle & high school in Germany, we learned that Poland had slavery 1,300 years, Bulgaria 500 years, America 400 years. The British called the people in India Blacks also not just Africans or African-Americans. Slavery is world wide even today. 

Visit the PolarisProject.org website to see what 

you can do to combat Modern Day Slavery.

Slavery in the Wieliczka-Bochnia Salt Mines of Poland from the 1,300's. It was dangerous work. The enslaved carved beautiful reliefs in salt still there. They were born lived & died below ground in the mines.

To see the UNESCO video Click Here 

Bible in German & English from American Pennsylvania communities.


We participated in the Irish Festival at Underground Atlanta where our museum exhibit was located for 2 years. I had hundreds of people write their family stories in journals during the festival. Many were not indentured the way my children were taught but had manumission papers freeing them from slavery. (Sometimes at the death of the owner)

Here is the list of the largest slave holders in the United State 1860 US Census: In Descending Order by Number of Slaves. Many people in America had to work their own small farms with only their family members everyone in America did not own or use slave labor. From reading history books I have found many children with that impression.

·  Estate of JOSHUA J. WARD, At SC, Georgetown, Roll 1235 Page 212, holding 1,130 Slaves.
·  STEPHEN DUNCAN, At Mississippi, Issaquena, Roll 598 Page 420B, holding 858 Slaves.
·  J. BURNESIDE, At LA, Ascension, Roll 427 Page 31B, holding 753 Slaves.
·  MEREDITH CALHOUN, At Louisiana, Rapides, Roll 430 Page 178, holding 709 Slaves.
·  WM. AIKEN, At SC, Colleton, Roll 1234 Page 1 of Jehossee Island, holding 700 Slaves.
·  JOHN L. MANNING, At Louisiana, Ascension, Roll 427 Page 31B, holding 670 Slaves.
·  JOS. A. S. ACKLEN, At Louisiana, West Feliciana, Roll 428 Page 291, holding 659 Slaves.
·  R. F. W. ALLSTON, At SC, Georgetown, Roll 1235 Page 120, holding 631 Slaves.
·  JOSEPH BLAKE At SC Beaufort, Roll 1231, Pg 89 of Prince William Parish, holding 575 Slaves
·  JNO. ROBINSON, At Mississippi, Madison, Roll 600, Page 418, holding 550 Slaves.
·  JERRETT BROWN, At Alabama, Sumter, Roll 35, Page 188B, holding 540 Slaves.
·  ARTHUR BLAKE, At SC, Charleston, Roll 1232 Page 307B, holding 538 Slaves.
·  JNO. J. MIDDLETON, At SC, Beaufort, Roll 1231 Pg 33 of Prince William Parish, holding 530 Slaves.
·  ELISHA WORTHINGTON, At Arizona, Chicot, Roll 53 Page 104, holding 529 Slaves.
·  DANIEL BLAKE, At SC, Colleton, Roll 1234 Page 103 of St. Bartholomew, holding 527 Slaves.
·  Estate J. C. JENKINS, At Mississippi, Wilkinson, Roll 604 Pgs. 385B & 395, holding 523 Slaves.
·  J. HARLESTON READ, At SC, Georgetown, Roll 1235 Page 105, holding 511 Slaves.
·  JNO. BUTLER, At GA, McIntosh, Roll 148 Page 207, holding 505 Slaves.
·  CHARLES HEYWARD, At SC, Colleton, Roll 1234 Pg 78 of St. Bartholomew, holding 491 Slaves.

Below is the Palantines Society Click For Information
They are a research group for people from 
Germany to America Genealogy Society 

Palatines to America (Pal Am) is a German Genealogy Society focused on helping members find their German-speaking ancestors.

I was born and raised in Germany. My father was in the military, U.S. Army, 3rd Armored Division. My mother's sisters and aunts came to visit us in Germany. We would tour Europe. I competed in many countries in several different sports for the United States & West Germany. I attended school in Hanau, Heidelberg and Berlin West Germany. The history I learned about the world and slavery is very different than what they teach in America.

(Pictured) My late mother, Aunt Sarah & me, in my dirndl (Germany dress) on her visit in Germany. In 1840 & 1841, my great grandfather, David Richardson Strother of South Carolina, applied for & received a passport to Germany with his brother.  I have a copy of them both.
Here is a list of my Strother Ancestors and where they can be found in the Palantine's Ancestor Chart Index to Volumes 01 – 18.

(Number is the volume where info can be found)
STROTHER, Behetheland 03
 STROTHER, Elizabeth 05     
STROTHER, Francis 03        
 STROTHER, Lancelot 03       
STROTHER, Richard 03      
STROTHER, William 03      


Beginning - Advanced "How-To" Genealogy

Cyndi's List A free site. The largest available site of indexed family history Internet sites in the world.

Ancestry.com Basically a pay site, but genealogy instruction, forms and other information are free.

Ancestry.com - Birth, Marriage & Death Records

The official indexes, order ancestors’ certificates.

 Military Records Service, medal records,
casualty lists &  Army & Navy records.

Rootsweb The oldest and largest free genealogy site. iInstruction under "Guide to Tracing your Family Tree".

Genealogy Learning Center

Basically a pay site, but their Learning Center is free.

Olive Tree

A free site with lots of how-to committed to making records available.

Access Genealogy (Free)

Beginning German Genealogy

German Genealogy Research Outline

German GenWeb 

Free site German genealogy 

Index to German Genealogy Online

German Research Outline

Free German Research Outline. 

Internet Sources for German Genealogy 

German Genealogy Internet Portal

Available in English or German

German Gothic Script Info and history about German records in gothic script.

Census Records

Census Records Online Free census index.

German History

German History

Links to specific periods in German History.

Palatine Migration

Deutsche Auswanderer USA
English language available

German Language

German Word List for Genealogists

Latin Word List for Genealogists
Latin words, helpful Catholic records

German Word Translation Online

English to German Sentence Translation
The Leo Dictionary
Has apps for Androids

German Embassy, Washington, DC

German Embassy, Washington D.C. 

German genealogical societies, magazines,
Internet sources and databases and publications.

German Information Center USA

Search Links, Ships & Passenger Lists
Palatine German Genealy/Ship Lists 


Huguenot were trying to escape religious persecution, Civil Wars and massacres. The Huguenot settlers immigrated to the American colonies directly from France and indirectly from the Protestant countries of Europe, including the Netherlands, England, Germany, and Switzerland (Was Huguenot haven of Geneva.). Although the Huguenots settled along almost the entire eastern coast of North America, they showed a preference for what are now the states of Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and South Carolina. 

Just as France suffered a notable loss though the emigration of these intelligent, capable people, so the American colonies gained. The colonists became farmers, laborers, ministers, soldiers, sailors, and people who engaged in government. The Huguenots supplied the colonies with excellent physicians and expert artisans and craftsmen. For example, Irénée du Pont brought his expertise for making gunpowder learned from the eminent Lavoisier; and Apollo Rivoire, a goldsmith, was the father of Paul Revere, master silversmith and renowned patriot. 

George Washington, himself, was the grandson of a Huguenot on his mother's side. The Huguenots adapted themselves readily to the New World. Their descendants increased rapidly and spread quickly. Today, people of Huguenot origin are found in all parts of our country.

Civil wars followed. On March 4, 1590, Prince Henry of Navarre led Huguenot forces against the Catholic League at the Battle of Ivry (pictured right) in Normandy, resulting in a decisive victory. 

Then, on April 13, 1598, as the newly crowned Henry IV, he issued the Edict of Nantes, which granted to the Huguenots toleration and liberty to worship in their own way. For a time, at least, there was more freedom for the Huguenots. However, about one hundred years later, on October 18, 1685, Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes. Practice of the "heretical" religion was forbidden. Huguenots were ordered to renounce their faith and join the Catholic Church. They were denied exit from France under pain of death. And, Louis XIV hired 300,000 troops to hunt the heretics down and confiscate their property. 

This revocation caused France to lose half a million of its best citizens. It was not until November 28, 1787, after the United States of America had gained its independence from England, that the Marquis de Lafayette, who was impressed by the fact that so many of the American leaders were of Huguenot descent, persuaded Louis XVI and the French Council to adopt an Edict of Toleration guaranteeing religious freedom to all in France.
"Dutch to English: 
Changes in the Lives of Women in the 17th Century" 

A lecture by Ulster County Historian Ann Gordon
Saturday, March 7, 2015 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. 
Deyo Hall Historic Huguenot Street
88 Huguenot Street New Platz, NY 12561
Telephone: 845-255-1660

"FDR: The Huguenot Connection" 
A lecture by Thomas Weikel, Director of Strategic Planning at Historic Huguenot Street 
Thursday, March 12, 2015 7:00 to 8:00 p.m.

St. James Chapel 10 East Market Street Hyde Park NY
For more information, contact St. James' Episcopal Church on 845-229-2820.

Annual Meeting of the Huguenot Society of America
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 Time: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
The Union Club New York NY
Speaker: Peter Duval, Chair of the Huguenot Heritage Centre, Rochester, Kent, UK *(Attendance by invitation)

Hope you will leave comments & questions here. 
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